January 7, 2015

IWSG Post #5!

IWSG

Guess what day it is! C'mon, guess!

No, it's not hump day, and no, it's not Prince spaghetti day.

It's IWSG day!

The first Wednesday of the month is set aside for insecure writers across the blog-o-sphere to share all of our individual experiences, the gud, the baaaaaad and the plug ugly.

And I am your most excellent host, G.B. Miller.

Today, I want to talk about a topic that while isn't near or especially dear to my heart, but it's something that everyone has probably experienced at one time or another, but first, the obligatory bio that was suggested by the powers that be so that for those of you who are coming by for the very first time know exactly who it is you're reading about. So, without further ado, would you kindly direct your attention to the center ring, specifically, the top front page of my book blog, where you will find a very decent (and very short) bio about moi.

With that out of the way, we now move on the topic du jour: Jealousy.

I have, from time to time, looked upon what some of my fellow writers (primarily Facebook) have created/produced and it quite simply blows my mind. The quantity of verbiage that they have churned out simply has no comparison, and when I compare what I have out to what they have out, I get that very strong urge to let loose with a few choice words.

I know that I shouldn't compare my output to theirs, especially since most of my writer friends have made something of a 2nd career out of it and thus are insanely motivated to be successful. While I would love to be that successful, I know it's not going to happen just yet. Whereas those people who I compare myself to have either been writing a lot longer than I have, or are retired from the real world (seems to a common theme in my circle), the real world has insidiously caused my output to drop down to zero.

I really shouldn't be jealous of other people's success, especially since I could be just like that if I put in the required amount of effort like they do. But, life has gotten in the way of me implementing my modest plan of attack, and until I can get that straightened out, I'll continue to marvel at what others have been able to do, and do my very best not to let my emotions get the better of me when it comes to writing.

(c) 2014 by G.B. Miller. All Rights Reserved.

20 comments:

  1. Hi, G.B.! I loved your intro in the beginning. :)

    I know how you feel. I'm constantly envious of how well certain authors handle all that being an author requires (publishing, social media, newsletters, etc.). I always feel behind, but this year I plan to move forward.

    We have to teach ourselves not to be jealous, though. We should look at these authors as mentors instead and let their successes push us to create out own. All writers are different. We are all at different levels. And that's actually good!

    I hope you make 2015 your year! :)

    IWSG Co-host

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    1. Thankee....I always like to get creative with my intros....:D

      I definitely agree that we should look at those authors as mentors, and in fact, I have learned quite a bit about writing from them. But sometimes, it is difficult not be envious of what they've accomplished.

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  2. Some of us don't have the hours others have to write. Or the speed. I'm a really slow writer and when people talk about pounding out a thousand words in an hour, it's depressing. It would take me three hours to do that. Maybe more!

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    1. Gotcha beat. Even on my best days, the most I was able to churn out was about one-third of that.

      The only time I get "speedy" with my writing, is when a story grabs my attention and demands that I hop to it. Otherwise, it usually take me on the average three to four months to write a first draft (usually a novella).

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  3. Hi G.B. - It's so great that you wrote about this today. I get jealous too!! And when I do, I can't help but let it wear me down. I think it's just human nature. But I always try to remind myself that we are all on different paths and we all have different timelines so I shouldn't compare myself to others. Easier said than done, I know, but I do think it's true. In the end, I try to be happy for those who have had more success than I have. Hopefully, one day, I'll be in their shoes. Anyway, thanks for the post. It's great to hear I'm not the only one. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's very tough not to let it wear you down, especially when life gets in the way of what you want to do. I'm always happy for those that I know deserve the accolades, but it still can blow me away from time to time.

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  4. Quantity and quality are often two entirely different things!

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    1. Absolutely.

      You can churn gobs of stuff and have the bulk of it be cannon fodder for the masses, or you can churn out very little, but each one that you do complete becomes something memorable.

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  5. I know this feeling. But just think, the regular job needed thing has been beyond our control due to economics of when we are doing the public infusion. n paying for family support.
    Stephen King has written SO MUCH, still I've managed to read all her has ever done in a short amount of time in comparison to the time it took to write. But he was lucky to begin when he did, 'cause it was possible to live off the income then. Now, it is not- Nor to be an artist, or a musician. My writing is far down the need to do list!.

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    1. With me, my writing (whether regular or blogging) has been my one pure release from the aggravation of the world but lately, it's been downright impossible to do any of it.

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  6. It's only human to be a little bit jealous sometimes.

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    1. True...so long as you don't go overboard.

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  7. My brother and my dad both crank out so much prose it blows my mind. But then they also do draft after draft after draft, whereas for me, the longest part of the writing process (as you probably know by now) is grappling with ideas in my head. Then I just sit down and type them out.

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    1. I think for me, the longest part of the writing process is actually either getting started or picking up where I left off at.

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  8. Amazing how easy it is for some. I'm impressed that you going for it, G.

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  9. I try not to think about how much more others have accomplished than I have otherwise I'd be thinking all the time about that and nothing else.

    Now about that spaghetti day thing. I've been craving some good spaghetti. I think I'll have to whip up a batch in the next week or so.

    Lee
    Tossing It Out

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    Replies
    1. I love pasta too, although it has a tendency to mess up my sugars, so I often don't eat with sauce.

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